Keynote Speakers

Dr Carmen Wiley

DAY ONE
9.00-9.45

ACB – AACC Transatlantic Lecture

Bio

Carmen is the 2019 – 2020 President of AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organization dedicated to better health through laboratory medicine. Carmen is the Chief Medical Officer of a start-up company based in Oakdale, MN and a Clinical Laboratory Affairs and Innovation Leader in Spokane, WA.

She has a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from the University of Minnesota, a Master’s degree in Organic Chemistry from the University of Washington, a Doctoral degree in Organic Chemistry from the University of Washington, and was a COMACC Accredited Fellow at the Mayo School of Medicine. She is board certified by American Board of Clinical Chemistry (ABCC) and a Fellow of the Academy of the American Association of Clinical Chemistry (FAACC).

She was a Regional Manager of Scientific Affairs – Cardiac at Roche Diagnostics. In this role, she was responsible for leading and developing the Medical & Scientific Liaisons in their relationships with the medical/scientific community, with the objective of critical scientific exchange including medical/scientific education. She played a key role in providing support to healthcare professionals as well as internal Roche scientific groups and local business teams.

Previously, she was the Scientific Director at PAML where she was responsible for the medical and scientific oversight of all laboratory testing and oversaw all aspects of PAML’s research and development program. Previously, she was Co-Director of Chemistry, Immunology, and Point of Care at Providence Health and Services, Sacred Heart Hospital in Spokane, WA and the Head of Clinical Chemistry in the Division of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the Marshfield Clinic in Marshfield, WI.

Talk Summary

“Alzheimer’s disease (AD): How can Clinical Laboratory Help?”

Nearly 6 million North Americans currently live with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and in the UK 850,000 people with dementia and AD is the most common type of dementia, affecting 62% of those diagnosed. With only 16% of seniors receiving regular cognitive assessments in North America, a consensus is arising in the field that in order to treat AD effectively, an early detection method is a must. Thus, there is a critical need for a novel minimally invasive and cost-effective diagnostic assay capable of such early detection.

I will review the current state of AD testing in the clinical laboratory and the emerging area of extracellular vesicles (EV) and their role in the progression of neurodegenerative disease including AD.

Learning objectives:
After completing this activity, the learner will be able to:

1. list the common tests used today in the clinical laboratory that aid in the diagnosis of AD
2. describe how extracellular vesicles (EV) play a role in the progression of neurodegenerative disease
3. summarize the role of current biomarkers and EVs will play in the discovery of new clinically relevant biomarkers and the development of better targeted molecular and biological therapies.

Prof Ana Maria Simundic

DAY TWO
9.00-9.45

RCPath Flynn Lecture

Bio

Prof. Ana-Maria Simundic, EuSpLM
Zagreb University
Zagreb, Croatia

Prof. Ana-Maria Simundic has received her graduate and postgraduate education at the Faculty of Pharmacy and Medical Biochemistry at the Zagreb University where she currently holds a professor position at the department of Medical Biochemistry. She is also teaching at the Tuzla University and Dubrovnik International University.
Prof. Simundic is currently employed at the Department of Medical Laboratory Diagnostics at the Clinical Hospital Sveti Duh in Zagreb, where she works as the Department Head.
She was the President of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine 2012-2018. Until the end of 2017, she has served as the Editor-in-chief of the journal Biochemia Medica, published by Croatian society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine. She now holds a Senior Editor position in that Journal.
Prof. Simundic has also reached wide international recognition with her engagement in the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) over the years, in her role of Executive Board Secretary (2011-2017), as the chair of the Working group for Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE) (2012-2018), Vice President of the EFLM (2018-2019), and currently as the President of EFLM (2020-2021). In her capacity of the chair of the WG-PRE, prof. Simundic has been the chair of the Organizing Committee of the past four highly successful Conferences in Preanalytical phase, which took place in Parma (2011), Zagreb (2013), Porto (2015), Amsterdam (2017) and Zagreb (2019), as well as the chair of the Scientific Committees of the Conferences in Preanalytical phase in Zagreb (2013), Porto (2015), Amsterdam (2017) and Zagreb (2019).
She was awarded with the Best Young Scientist award (2000) and Best Research award (2011) by the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine, with the Per Hyltoft Petersen Award (2012) by the Slovak Society of Laboratory Medicine and with the Honorary membership of the Hungarian society for Laboratory medicine (2012) and Italian society for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory medicine (2020). In 2015 she was among the Top 100 Powerlist of the British journal: The pathologist.
Prof. Simundic has authored or co-authored numerous peer reviewed manuscripts. Her research activities focus on quality management and preanalytical phase.

Talk Summary

In line with the theme of this Congress (Vision for the future), the lecture on the ‘Quality of the pre-analytic phase’ will address some unresolved challenges and offer a glimpse into the future of preanalytics.

We will talk about how quality of preanalytical phase affects patient outcome and how it adds to the value of laboratory medicine. Also, challenges in effective preanalytical quality management shall be addressed. During the lecture, some examples will be presented to improve the understanding of the problem.

I hope to rase a lot of questions and hopefully offer at least some answers.

Speakers

Prof Jim Bonham

Paediatric Biochemistry / Pregnancy

DAY ONE
11.15 – 11.45

Five year review of expanded newborn screening in England

Bio

Jim Bonham began in the NHS in 1974 and has spent most of that time in Paediatrics including Newborn Screening.
He is currently the national laboratory lead for screening on behalf of Public Health England and is President of the International Society of Neonatal Screening.
From 2012 he helped introduce additional metabolic disorders into the national programme which became fully incorporated in England and Wales in 2015.
His interests are in maximising the impacts and benefits of newborn screening around the world while recognising and mitigating the potential for harm that can result from any public health intervention that affects all babies and their families.

Talk Summary

Five year review of expanded newborn screening in England and Wales
JR Bonham, Sheffield Children’s (NHS)FT

An NIHR initiative, the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care provided the impetus to evaluate five additional metabolic conditions – IVA, MSUD, GA1, HCU and LCHADD for inclusion as part of the national newborn screening programme. Four of these were accepted on the basis of this two study and screening began in all newborn labs in England and Wales in 2015.

In this presentation we will review how the original predictions of sensitivity and specificity matched reality five years on. In addition, we will look at some of the issues which the inclusion of some of these life threatening disorders places upon newborn screening when balancing the benefits and harms that result from all forms of screening.

In particular, we will look at the impact of methodological variability and how this may be addressed, the impact of sample quality, the need for both improved transport arrangements and for extended working to support six day reporting. In addition we will examine the need for understandable and accessible information to support parents receiving the shock of a screen positive screening result and the challenge to chart longer term outcomes in patients who go on to have a diagnosis confirmed and receive treatment.

Prof Christa Cobbaert

Laboratory Science of the Future

DAY TWO 
10.45 – 11.15

Analytical Test Performance Specification

Bio

Professor of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), Leiden (NL)

Christa Cobbaert is Professor of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Leiden. She is heading the Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine of the Leiden University Medical Center.

Her scientific research focuses on test evaluation with great attention to standardization, harmonization and trueness verification of medical test results, for the sake of improving patient management and patient care. In the domains of clinical proteomics and precision diagnostics she works on the selection, development and standardization of better protein biomarkers using quantitative clinical chemistry proteomics, as promising alternative for immunoassay- based tests. She has several appointments on (inter)national positions because of her expertise on metrological traceability of test results. She is vice chair of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) Scientific Division EC and member of ISO TC 212/ working group 2. She chairs the European Federation of Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) working group on Test Evaluation, and at the national level she is heading the Dutch Calibration 2.000 initiative. She also leads the IFCC working group on standardization of serum apolipoproteins by mass spectrometry. Her scientific work is done in close collaboration with international colleagues and has resulted in ca. 180 original publications.

Talk Summary

Molecular characterization of protein measurands: its time has come.
The apolipoprotein(a) example

Lp(a) is a genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Its causal association with myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral arterial disease has been masked for about 15 years because of flawed immunoassays and incorrect assumptions regarding the chemical composition of this particle. Therefore, the expression of Lp(a) particle concentrations in mass units is metrologically inappropriate. Assays that allow direct measurement with molecular characterization of the protein measurands of interest are key for guaranteeing metrological traceability. Mass spectrometry using LC-MRM-MS allows molecular characterization of the apolipoprotein(a) measurand and enables accurate quantitation in molar units, unaffected by the apo(a) size polymorphism and glycosylation. Envisioned traceability of apo(a) to SI can only be accomplished with an unequivocally molecularly defined protein measurand, well selected calibrators and the consistent use of molar units.

Prof Paul Collinson

Point of Care Testing

DAY ONE

15.15-15.45

Cardiac Biomarkers in the ED and Critical Care – to POCT or not POCT

Bio

Dr P. O Collinson MA MB BChir FRCPath MD FACB FRCP edin FESC. Consultant Chemical Pathologist at St George’s Hospital and Professor of Cardiovascular Biomarkers at St George’s University of London. He studied at St Catharine’s College Cambridge (Medicine and Biochemistry) and subsequently at St Thomas Hospital and the Royal Free Hospital. He was Consultant (Chemical Pathology) at the Mayday Hospital, Croydon then transferred to St George’s. He runs the Vascular Risk management service and oversees the Cardiac Prevention and Rehabilitation service for the Cardiac Department. Published over 220 papers and review articles, 240 abstracts and 15 book chapters. Likes SCUBA diving and photographing sharks. Especially the ones with big teeth.

Talk Summary

Cardiac Biomarkers in Emergency Medicine – to POC or not to POC, that is the question.

Professor Paul Collinson, Departments of Clinical Blood Sciences and Cardiology, St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and St George’s University of London, London, UK
The measurement of the cardiac troponins (cTn), cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) are integral to the diagnostic algorithms for the management of patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS). In patients presenting with ST segment elevation on the electrocardiogram (ECG) there is a presumptive diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI), ST elevation MI (STEMI). Measurement of cTn is still required to finalise the diagnosis but not in a time critical manner. In contrast, in patients presenting without clear ECG evidence of myocardial infarction, measurement of cTnT or cTnI are critical for diagnosis and management decisions. It therefore follows that a rapid turnaround time combined with the immediacy of results return which is achieved by point of care testing (POCT) offers a substantial clinical benefit. Rapid results return plus immediate decision-making should translate into improved patient flow and improved therapeutic decision-making. Indeed, it has been shown by randomised controlled trials that point of care testing can be translated into more rapid diagnosis with financial savings.
The switch to cTn in the universal definition of MI provided a spur to the manufacturers to improve the analytical quality of cTn measurement. This has culminated in the development of high sensitivity troponin assays. These high sensitivity assays offer significant clinical advantages. Diagnostic algorithms have been devised utilising very low cut-offs at first presentation and rapid sequential measurements based on admission and 1 hour sampling. These protocols also utilise change in troponin values, delta troponin. Such troponin algorithms are ideally suited to point of care testing. The turnaround time achieved by the diagnostic laboratory of typically 60 minutes corresponds to the sampling interval required by the clinician using the algorithm. However, the limits of detection and analytical imprecision required to utilise these algorithms is not yet met by any easy-to-use POCT systems. Currently, such systems would need a 3-6 hour rule out protocol to achieve the same degree of diagnostic efficiency that can be achieved by a combination of admission and 1-2 hour sampling using laboratory-based high sensitivity systems. This is the challenge for POCT, one which is beginning to be met.

Dr Aisling Courtney

Analytical Test Performance Specification

Day One
11.15-11.45

Cardiac Biomarkers in the ED and Critical Care – to POCT or not POCT

Bio

Coming Soon…

Talk Summary

Coming Soon…

Dr Ellie Dow

Big Data In Laboratory Medicine

Day One
11.45 -12.15

Intelligent Algorithims for the automated assessments of derenged LFTs

Bio

Dr. Ellie Dow received her BSc(Hons) in Biochemistry from the University of Glasgow, qualified in Medicine from the Middlesex Hospital, London, and gained her PhD in Molecular Genetics from Imperial College, University of London. She currently works as Consultant Chemical Pathologist in the department of Blood Sciences, based at Ninewells Hospital in Dundee, and is Joint Clinical Lead for the North of Scotland region laboratories. She has interests in the use of laboratory information technology, particularly in improving the clinical interface between users and the laboratory. Dr Dow is the laboratory lead for the Intelligent Liver Pathway.

Talk Summary

iLFT – the Intelligent Liver Pathway
Liver disease is the 5th largest cause of death in the UK, and the only major disease area where the mortality rate is increasing in those under 65 years of age. Liver function tests (LFTs) are commonly requested for the assessment and progression of liver disease. 20% are abnormal, causes being complex and often under-investigated, and patients can have multiple follow up visits to their GP. The multi-disciplinary integrated iLFT team recognised that the laboratory can play a crucial role in improving diagnosis and prognosis of liver disease, collaborating to produce and implement an Intelligent Liver Function testing algorithm, based on a minimum data set agreed by the Scottish Hepatology Advisory Group. This algorithm utilises existing technologies and functionalities within order communications and laboratory information management systems, as well as automated analysers and laboratory tracking systems, to ensure that patients are appropriately investigated, and produces diagnostic and management reports for GPs. The algorithm maximises detection of early liver disease, increases appropriate investigation and follow up for patients with abnormal LFTs, delivering cost-effective high quality patient care, proven in a clinical trial. iLFT is now standard practice in NHS Tayside, and selected for implementation across Scotland by the Scottish Government.

Danielle Freedman

Clinical Cases Session

Day TWO
11.45 -12.15

Clinical Cases Session

Bio

Dr. Danielle B. Freedman
MB BS, FRCPath., EuSpLM
Consultant Chemical Pathologist & Associate Physician in Clinical Endocrinology, Director of Pathology, and now in addition, Chief Medical Adviser (since September 2015) at Luton & Dunstable University Hospital, UK . She was also the Hospital Medical Director from October 2005 until December 2010.
She trained in medicine at the Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine, University of London, and then went on for further training in Clinical Biochemistry and Endocrinology both at the Royal Free Hospital and the Middlesex Hospital, University of London.
Nationally, in the UK, she was elected Vice President of Royal College of Pathologists (RCPath) (2008 – 2011) and sat on RCPath Executive and Council (2005 – 11).
She is a Member of the UK National External Quality Assurance Scheme (NEQAS) Clinical Chemistry Advisory Group for Interpretative Comments (2010 – ) and also was National Member of Association for Clinical Biochemistry & Laboratory Medicine (ACB) Council (2011 – 2015).
She is now the Chair of Lab Tests Online Board UK (2012 – ) A Peer reviewed, Non Commercial , Patient Centered website – resource for patients and public
Her main interests include clinical endocrinology, point of care testing and, importantly, the value of laboratory testing with regard to patient safety and patient outcome.
She has over 100 publications in peer review journals including Lancet, New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA and Annals of Clinical Biochemistry in her areas of interest, as well as 10 book chapters.
She is a frequently invited speaker both nationally and internationally on the above topics. She won the ‘Outstanding Speaker’ award in 2009 from the American Association of Clinical Chemistry (AACC) and again in 2015,
She was a Member of the AACC Annual Meeting Organising Committee (AMOC) for 2011 (Atlanta) and also Member of AMOC for 2014 (Chicago).
Nominated as one of the TOP 100 International Power List of Influential Laboratory Medicine Professionals ( November 2015)
In July 2018, she was awarded the very prestigious award of Honorary Membership of the Association of Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine for her International work in Laboratory Medicine
In her spare time, she likes classic cars, modern art and rock music from the 70’s and 80’s.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon…

Prof Davide Gonzalez de Castro 

Laboratory Science of the Future

Day TWO
11.45-12.15

Cancer Genomics in Clinical Practice

Bio

Coming Soon…

Talk Summary

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Philip Turner

Point of Care Testing

Day TWO
14.15 – 14.45

The Clinical Impact of POCT in Primary Care

Bio

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Talk Summary

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Prof Jonathan Kay

Management for the 21st Century

Day TWO
14.45 – 15.15

Disruption in healthcare: how the laboratory can add value

Bio

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Talk Summary

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Dr Chris Laing

Big Data In Laboratory Medicine

Day ONE
11.15 – 11.45

Improving detection and prediction of AKI using digital and AI technologies

Bio

Coming Soon…

Talk Summary

Coming Soon…

Prof Mark Lawler 

Bio

Prof Mark Lawler, Associate Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Professor of Digital Health, and Chair in Translational Cancer Genomics, Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast (QUB) 

Mark is an internationally renowned scientist who has published over 200 papers including key papers in the highest impact journals (New Engl J Medicine, Lancet, Nature Medicine, Lancet Oncology, Cancer Discovery, Nature CommsGut etc). Mark’s work has been recognised by a number of national/international awards including the Vander Molen Prize for Leukaemia ResearchEly Lilly PrizeSt Lukes Medal for Cancer Research, Graves Medal for Medical Research and the prestigious 2018 European Health Award 

Mark is Associate Director of Health Data Research Wales-Northern Ireland, one of 6 substantive sites of Health Data Research UK (HDR-UK), which is driving innovative precision medicine and public health approaches through the use of Big Data. He is overall UK lead for the Cancer Data Research Strategy for HDR-UK and Scientific Director for DATA-CAN, the National Health Data Research Hub for Cancer. In the wake of the Cambridge Analytica/Facebook scandal, Mark led a pan European group developing a roadmap to restore public trust in health data, published in Lancet Oncology 

Mark was co-chair of the Cancer Task Team of the Clinical Working Group of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, an international cooperative dedicated to effective and responsible sharing of genomic/clinical data. He has authored a number of key papers including a blueprint for cancer data sharing (Nature Medicine) and a road map/call to action for a Global Cancer Data Knowledge Network in the New England Journal of Medicine He is co-lead of an ambitious proposal, as part of the Belfast Region City Deal, to develop a Global Innovation Institute including a One Health Innovation Centre (OHIC), one of Europe’s  first Health/Agri-Food Informatics Innovation Centres.   

Mark is the Queen’s Lead of the £5M Medical Research Council-Cancer Research UK funded  Stratified Medicine in Colorectal Cancer Consortium (S:CORT), a UK-wide consortium investigating novel precision medicine approaches in CRC. His international reputation in CRC was instrumental in his leading a Critical Gaps in CRC Research Initiative, published in the high impact factor journal Gut; this landmark publication has attracted significant global attention. Mark is a member of the Board of the European Alliance for Personalised Medicine (EAPM) and led the development of EAPM’s research strategy.  

Mark has a strong commitment to patient-centred research/care and to addressing cancer inequalities. He was the architect of the European Cancer Patient’s Bill of Rights (BoR), a catalyst for change and empowerment tool for cancer patients which he launched in the European Parliament on World Cancer Day 2014. The Bill of Rights received The 2018 European Health Award, a prestigious award for partnerships that yield real health impact in Europe, which Mark received during the 2018 European Health Forum Gastein, the premier European health policy conference. Mark’s has a particular interested in addressing cancer challenges in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and has highlighted the need for data-driven research to empower cancer control strategies in the region. He is also committed to the provision of optimal pathology and laboratory medicine for citizens in resource-limited settings and was senior author of a paper in The Lancet as part of The Lancet Series on Pathology and Laboratory Medicine in Low- and Middle- Income Countries. He is leading the Lancet Oncology Groundshot Commission to provide the evidence base and road map for cancer research in Europe, with a particular focus on CEE countries 

Talk Summary

Coming Soon…

Carel le Roux

New Developments in Old Disease

Day TWO
10.45 – 11.15

Challenges after bariatric surgery

Bio

Professor Carel le Roux graduated from medical school in Pretoria South Africa, completed his specialist training in metabolic medicine at St Bartholomew’s Hospitals and the Hammersmith Hospitals. He obtained his PhD from Imperial College London where he later took up a faculty position. He moved to University College Dublin for the Chair in Experimental Pathology and he is now the Director of the Metabolic Medicine Group. He previously received a President of Ireland Young Researcher Award, Irish Research Council Laurate Award, Clinician Scientist Award from the National Institute Health Research in the UK, and a Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Fellowship for his work on how the gut talks to the brain.

Talk Summary

What is the value of surgery to achieve weight loss and what strategies can be used to maintain the weight loss?
Professor Carel le Roux
Diabetes Complications Research Centre, Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Ireland
Bariatric surgery reduces appetite in humans which allows patients to behave around food intake the way they and health care professions want them to behave. Surgery thus reduces the body fat set point which allows body weight to settle down after an approximate 25% bodyweight reduction.
Changes also occur in the sensory, reward and physiological domains of taste that may mechanistically contribute to the alterations in food preferences after gastric bypass. The sustained nature of weight loss, reduced appetite and shifts in food preferences may be explained by gut adaptation and chronic hormone elevation.
Glycaemic control improves rapidly and is a result of several mechanisms including reduction in calorie intake, weight, hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance as well as an enhanced insulin secretion. Significantly altered gut hormones and bile acid metabolism have been implicated. Finally the improved metabolic milieu results in end organ damage reversal in some patients.
Following bariatric surgery, a pleiotrophic endocrine response may contribute to improved appetite reduction, long-term lowering of body weight, glycaemic control and improvements in end organ damage.

Prof Danny McAuley

New Developments in Old Disease

Day TWO
12.15-12.45

Recent developments in diagnosis and management of ARDS in ICU

Bio

Danny McAuley is a Consultant and Professor in Intensive Care Medicine at the Regional Intensive Care Unit at the Royal Victoria Hospital and Queen’s University of Belfast. He undertook his training in Belfast, Birmingham, London and San Francisco. He is Programme Director for the MRC/NIHR Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation (EME) programme and Co-Director of Research for the UK Intensive Care Society. He has several research interests including Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and clinical trials.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon…

Dr Ronan McMullan

Point of Care Testing

Day ONE
14.45-15.15

POCT for infectious Disease

Bio

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Talk Summary

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Dr Siobhan O’Sullivan

Paediatric Biochemistry/ Pregnancy

Day ONE
11.45-12.15

Impact of genomic Sequencing on Paediatric Metabolic Services

Bio

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Talk Summary

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Dr Claire Roddie

Laboratory Science of the Future

Day TWO
12.15 – 12.45

CAR-T in clinical practice

Bio

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Talk Summary

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Dr Leighton Seal

New Developments in Old Disease

Day TWO
11.45-12.15

Clinical Biochemistry of Transgender Patients

Bio

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Talk Summary

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Dr Andrew St John

Day TWO
15.15-15.45

The Value Proposition for Laboratory Medicine

Bio

Dr Andrew St John is a clinical biochemist, having worked in laboratories and in the IVD industry, in various parts of the world including Europe, Asia and Australia. He now works as a freelance consultant including providing scientific advice to diagnostic companies and healthcare organisations. Dr St John also manages Lab Tests Online in Australia, the leading source of information about pathology tests for consumers and patients in Australia. His major interests are in point of care testing and how to determine the economic value of laboratory testing.

Talk Summary

The use of a value proposition to achieve better test adoption and implementation
Andrew St John
Chair, IFCC-WASPaLM Committee for the Value Proposition in Laboratory Medicine
Perth, Western Australia

Healthcare providers throughout the world are being challenged to demonstrate value in how they deliver services. For laboratories whose current business model is generally based on costs, this is a significant challenge, primarily because the outcomes or benefits from testing are delivered outside and frequently remote from the laboratory. Despite this, various professional groups are working on ways that the value of laboratory testing can be demonstrated. A combined IFCC-WASPaLM Committee is using a concept often used in business called a value proposition and translating that into a tool that laboratories can use to implement new tests or improve the use of existing tests. By specifying in some detail how a test should be used for specific pressure clinical circumstances including the supporting clinical and economic evidence, the aim is to achieve a more efficient translation of the global evidence of test value into local practice. The Committee’s work to date has included describing the value proposition for various different tests including high-sensitive troponin and NT-proBNP. Work is also proceeding on ways to introduce economic analyses to laboratory professionals; such analyses are obviously key to demonstrating value. The challenges of this type of work include the need to obtain clinician involvement and to get traction with moving what might be perceived as theoretical approaches, into routine practice.

Dr Huub van Rossum

Day TWO
15.45-16.15

Patient Based Real Time Quality Control

Bio

Huub van Rossum is a specialist in laboratory medicine and clinical chemistry at the Netherlands Cancer Institute. He has a background in analytical chemistry and pharmaceutical sciences and followed his training for becoming a specialist in laboratory medicine in The Bronovo hospital in The Hague, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands) and Stanford Medical Center (USA). Next he worked for about a year in the University Medical Center in Utrecht on the implementation of best practice QC. In 2015 he started his company Huvaros (www.huvaros.com) that markets MA Generator, an application that supports the laboratory specific optimization and validation of patient-based real-time QC. Since 2014 Huub works as a laboratory specialist in the Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in Amsterdam. Here he is responsible, together with his colleague, for all routine clinical diagnostics including chemistry, immunochemistry, hematology and blood transfusion. His current research focuses on patient-based real-time quality control, the development and improvement of cancer biomarkers, diagnostic validation of longitudinal (tumor) biomarkers and implementation of these in routine clinical practice.

Talk Summary

In the last couple of years new insights in the understanding and practical application of patient based real time quality control (PBRTQC) have been obtained. PBRTQC differs in several ways from statistical internal QC and combining both techniques allows improved analytical quality assurance and a more (cost-)efficient QC plan. Challenges for laboratories are how to obtain proper laboratory specific settings, how to intergrade these new techniques with standard QC and how to operate PBRTQC in routine practice. Recently, tools and documentation that addresses these issues has become available for medical laboratories, amongst others via an IFCC working group. This talk will briefly overview these recent developments, increase the understanding and potential application of PBRTQC techniques and aims to provide guidance when interested in implementing patient-based real-time QC on your lab.

Dr Manu Vatish

Paediatric Biochemistry/ Pregnancy

Day ONE
10.45 – 11.15

Angiogenic Biomarkers in Pre-eclampsia

Bio

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Talk Summary

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Prof William Wade

Laboratory Science of the Future

Day TWO
11.15 – 11.45

The Human microbiome in health & disease

Bio

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Talk Summary

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TBC

Point of Care Testing

Day ONE
16.15 – 17.00

ACB Foundation Lecture

Bio

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Talk Summary

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IMPORTANT DATES

 

Congress Dates

10 – 12 March 2021

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Call for Abstracts

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Registration Opens

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Early Registration Ends

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